Wild About Cloth Diapers Giveaway


This post is sponsored by Over the Moon Diapers.

Winter Cloth Diaper Prints

It’s a shame that winter-themed cloth diaper prints are hard to show off. There’s that pesky problem of having to be a good parent and put pants on your baby in cold weather and such.

This season we’ve seen a number of adorable holiday and winter cloth diaper prints – some just recently released. Let’s hear your thoughts on which print is the cutest! Voting ends December 31!

AppleCheeks Delishmas Best Bottom Flurry Bummis Penguin Party gDiapers Good Tidings Peachy Green Holly Jolly SoftBums Snowflake HTML Map

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Innovation Appreciation: SoftBums

Have you ever found a product that’s so great it makes you want to stop everyone you meet and tell them about it? When I find something that makes my role as a mom easier, I just feel so thankful someone invented it! That’s what the “Innovation Appreciation” giveaway is all about. That and a chance for you to win over $450 in fabulous prizes – YES!!!

Innovation Appreciation Giveaway

Here at Diaper Wrecker we’re going to give away one of my favorite brands of cloth diapers – SoftBums. Their “Slide2Size” toggle system is truly awesome!

With traditional “rise snap” grids on the front of one-size diapers, you’re limited to just two, three, or perhaps four different settings, usually about an inch apart. I love the SoftBums’ toggle system because it allows me to adjust the leg elastic in my boys’ diapers in exactly the increments I want. It truly fits from newborn to toddler:

SoftBums is truly a one-size diaper!!

An added bonus with SoftBums is that if someone else is changing my child’s diaper, they really don’t have to be a cloth diaper pro. I find that the rise snap grid on most cloth diapers tends to confuse people.

If you’re ready to get started with SoftBums, Over the Moon Diapers is giving away a “DryPod Starter Bundle” with three shells, twelve stay-dry inserts (“pods”), and a wet bag. Purchased separately, these items cost over $125, so the starter bundle is an amazing prize!! Enter to win between now and July 11.

 

What Materials Absorb Fastest?

Speed of Absorption Testing

Don’t hate me, but I’ve never had much of a problem with leaking cloth diapers. I like to attribute this to the following factors: (1) My baby has the perfect body type, (2) My impeccable instincts lead me to only the very best cloth diapers, (3) I’ve devised a fool-proof laundry routine, and (4) I always know precisely which insert or combination of inserts to use for every occasion.

I kid, I kid. I’m sure it’s mostly just dumb luck.

For parents who are having trouble with leaks, though, it can be a huge hassle. You’re dealing with a baby who should be sleeping but instead is awake, crying, and wet. You’re making frequent clothing changes for the baby (and possibly having to change your own clothes and the sheets as well). While doing all that extra laundry, you find yourself wondering, “Is the diaper repelling? Is it not fitting properly? Is my baby just an unusually heavy or fast wetter?”

If you have eliminated the possibility of repelling or a fit problem, you can experiment with different types of absorbent materials.

I’ve always heard microfiber described as a “fast-absorbing” material, but wasn’t inclined to believe it. It’s a synthetic material, and if you’ve ever thrown a microfiber insert in a bowl of water, you might have noticed that it will float happily on the surface of the water for quite some time before succumbing to the fathoms below. (Wait, what?! You mean to tell me that no one else does this for fun?!)

Floating Microfiber

“Microfiber Magic Carpet Ride” – cue music from the Aladdin soundtrack.

I decided it was high time I test the speed of absorbency of various cloth diaper materials for myself and then spread the word. You know, for the edification of cloth diapering parents everywhere. And to satisfy my own curiosity.

The testing method involved emptying a syringe of 50 mL of water into a tube that is anchored and weighted where it touches the insert (to simulate a good, snug fit on baby). I simply timed how long it took each insert to absorb the full 50 mL of water.

Testing Method

The lineup of test subjects from my own personal stash included two synthetic-fiber inserts and two natural-fiber inserts. The results? Yeah, totally proved my “slow-absorbing microfiber” theory wrong. Both microfiber inserts absorbed the water significantly faster than the natural-fiber inserts:

  • 19.1 seconds – bumGenius microfiber
  • 21.0 seconds – Rumparooz microfiber
  • 27.7 seconds – SoftBums bamboo
  • 30.0 seconds – Thirsties hemp
Speed of Absorption Test Results

Left to Right: Thirsties large hemp insert (55% hemp, 45% cotton), Rumparooz one-size 6r microfiber soaker (80% polyester, 20% polymide), SoftBums one-size bamboo pod (70% organic bamboo, 30% organic cotton), and bumGenius one-size microfiber insert (microfiber terry).

Now don’t go hating on the natural fibers just because they’re slower on the uptake. Natural fibers are more breathable, less prone to build-up problems, and often better for babies with sensitive skin. And for lucky folks like me who don’t have leak problems, speed of absorption doesn’t really matter. I just wanted to know!

What is your favorite type of insert and why?

All in Two Diaper Guide for 2013

All in two diapers (AI2s) – what’s not to love? They last longer, generate less diaper laundry, and are more economical than pockets and all-in-ones. Each brand has a slightly different system with slightly different choices, so I’ve compiled one handy guide that compares the best all in twos available. In one quick glance you can compare where they’re made, sizing, pricing, closures, insert options, and more! Download the free PDF guide by clicking here.

cover-image-ai2s

How many inserts per cover you need for your all-in-two system will depend on your baby’s age. Babies who are not yet eating solid foods tend to have messier diapers, which may require you to wash the covers more frequently. Therefore, in the early months, you might find yourself in need of three inserts per cover, but later, you can go through as many as five or six inserts before needing to wash the cover. Covers contain the more delicate materials (elastic and laminate), so washing causes wear and tear on these components. By using an all-in-two system, you can keep your cloth diapers in better condition for longer than is possible with other systems that require washing after every single use. Hopefully this means you can resell them for more, or use them on more than one child!

For cost comparison purposes, I ran numbers assuming purchasing six inserts per cover in the full range of available sizes to fit a baby from newborn to potty training (hypothetically). Six was the easiest number of inserts to calculate because some brands’ inserts are sold in packages of two, three, or six.

Even the most expensive option averages out to $19.99 per change, which is right in line with the price of a typical pocket diaper or AIO.

Cost per change of AI2 diapers

  • gDiapers – $19.99 per diaper change. Includes covers in small, medium, and large at $17.99 each, plus two six-packs of gCloth at $32.99 (NB/S and M/L/XL sizes).
  • Best Bottom – $14.68 per diaper change. Includes one shell at $16.95, plus six stay-dry microfiber inserts in S, M, and L at $3.95 each.
  • GroVia – $11.80 per diaper change. Includes one shell at $16.95 with three 2-packs of stay-dry soakers at $17.95 each.
  • SoftBums – $11.56 per diaper change. Includes one Echo shell at $21.95, six small DryTouch pods at $2.95 each, and six large DryTouch pods at $4.95 each.
  • Flip – $7.48 per diaper change. Includes one cover at $14.95 with two 3-packs of stay-dry inserts at $14.95 each.

 

Are you a fan of all in two diapers? If so, what’s your favorite system and why?