Diaper Wrecking: Repelling Diapers

1_Repelling cloth diapers

One of the fun things about being the Diaper Wrecker is that I get to experiment with all the things you’re not supposed to do to cloth diapers. After all, what better way to explain what actually happens and how to fix it? Oftentimes people jump to the assumption that they have repelling diapers when leaks occur. This post will help you understand what can cause repelling (hint: any of the products pictured above). In the next post, we’ll talk about what true repelling looks like and how to fix it.

Without further ado, I’d like to introduce you our brave contender, hailing from China, the Sunbaby pocket diaper. I decided to do this experiment with a Sunbaby diaper because they’re dirt cheap. In my experience with Sunbabies, the inserts are very thin and the snaps fall off after just a month or two of light use. However, fleece is fleece and that’s the subject of this experiment. I wanted two identical diapers – one to wreck and one to use as a “before” example – and I didn’t want to break the bank or shed any tears over ruining a really good diaper. So Sunbaby got the job.

2_The Contenders

My first order of business (after washing them) was to test how long it would take the diapers to absorb 50 ml of water under pressure to simulate a baby wearing the diaper. I did this test on both diapers, once in front and once in back, and the average time to absorb the 50 ml was approximately 8 seconds.

3_Speed of Absorption Test

The party really got going when I busted out a couple of Desitin samples I had received as a part of a baby shower gift about a year and a half ago. I’m not sure why I saved them, but I’m glad I didn’t have to buy Desitin just for this occasion. The samples were perfect. I slathered them all over that Sunbaby. I got a bad feeling about it when I tried to wash the cream off my fingers. My prediction is that it’s not going to be an easy task to remove the Desitin build-up from this diaper.

4_Desitin Application

Next it was time to prepare the cauldron. I mean, the bucket of water with a little Downy. I haven’t used Downy in a long time, but I have a big Costco-size jug of it sitting in my laundry room that’s mostly full so I haven’t wanted to throw it away. (Is this a theme with me? Am I at risk of becoming a hoarder?)

Pretty swirls! It also smelled nice. I must admit, I kind of miss that smell.

5_Downy Bath

And then it was time for Sunbaby to take a little bath. As I dropped it in, I sang to myself “Quel dommage, what a loss! Here we go in the sauce!” (Name that Disney movie.)

6_Here We Go

And here she rested for 24 hours. If that doesn’t cause repelling diapers, I don’t know what will!


Check out part 2 of the repelling experiment for how to fix this kind of a mess!

Trackbacks

  1. […] slathering this poor diaper with Desitin and soaking it in a Downy bath for 24 hours, I was pretty sure I had successfully created a repelling problem. I hung it up to dry, and I was […]

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  3. […] hate me, but I’ve never had much of a problem with leaking cloth diapers. I like to attribute this to the following factors: (1) My baby has the perfect body type, (2) My […]

  4. […] store. Using a particularly pasty or greasy ointment can lead to a cloth diaper woe known as repelling, in which the fibers of the cloth aren’t able to absorb moisture properly because the residue […]

  5. […] ultra-greasy diaper creams are common culprits when it comes to repelling. Remember when I tried to ruin a diaper with Downy and Desitin? But how about zinc oxide? It’s an ingredient found in a lot of skin-care products and […]